African pop culture (The Farmers of Africa)

This episode is to revalue the farmers, the feeders and breeders of nations, this is an exemplified and explanatory illustration of the obstacles and problems withheld by the African farmers. From the African farmers!!

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“Plant a seed, feed a nation”was the preamble I grew up hearing right from childhood. More frequent than most everybody talked about how important farmers are to a nation.

  Schools made us farm as an extra curricular activity, I dreaded it so much and for some reason best known to the soil apportioned to me, my seeds never seemed to germinate. Oh well’ guess I wasn’t cut out for that.

 The movie “12 years a slave” is an award winning movie centered on slavery, but it expanciated on how Africans were forced to serve their masters and work in huge farmlands for days without enough food and less water, they were used to feed the colonies and their families. 

  Gradually it started to sink in, the importance of farmers cannot be overemphasized, they are the backbone of any economy. 

  Undoubtedly, the potentials of the  “African land” is phenomenal, its citizens are hardworking and capable of providing financial security, abundant farm yields, affordable educational system for the children, life security and a standard living for its people and the world at large. However, most of these potentials are left untapped due to the insufficient funding and financial support from the leaders of African states. More attention is paid to the common minerals that are feasible like gold, bitumen, oil and gas etc and they spend millions trying to harness them forgetting they might run out really soon.

Problems faced by the African farmers all generate from the deficient “financial support and investment” from the government of the states. And other Private owned organizations For example÷

* farmers can’t increase the size of their farmlands to accommodate more crops because they lack the finance, And the cost of purchasing a piece of land is ridiculously high these days. 

* inadequate access to fertilizers- due to the importance of this material to crops, the price has been escalated and keeps escalating, making it almost impossible for the farmers to purchase the quantity they need, they end up getting insignificant quantity that surmount to nothing at the end of the day.

* the major of all these obstacles remain the inability to purchase some basic farm implements and machineries that make work easier, faster and more efficient.  These farmers barely make enough money to feed themselves and their families, so it is absolutely preprostrous for them to purchase machines. With sufficient finance and funding they can purchase basic machineries like the land mower, chisel plow, sprayer, conveyor belt, grain dryer or even the common farm truck. But without these, they end up doing them manually which consumes time and gives chance to errors, it also resonates to very little farm output and unhealthy yields due to insufficient fertilization. 

  My plea is not only to the Leaders of Africa but for every single one of us to embrase the farmers and not see them as the low lives of the community but instead the “feeders of nations” that they rightfully are, let’s give them the support and aid that they require because they work for us all and they plant the trees that gives us oxygen(major bonus). Imagine a world without farmers? That’s starvation you see, that’s self inflicted famine. 

    The potential is there, the strength and will power is present, the ability and love that goes with all things is available abundantly, all that is required now is the support and mainly that of the “leaders”. 

   I visited various African farmlands and had a one-on-one conversation with the farmers to hear their opinions and deep rooted thoughts of the challenges and problems they face trying to feed the nation. I just aired some of it here! Stay glued for yet another episode of the African pop Culture-APC 

For a closing, here are some photos for your viewing pleasure 🙂

Many blessings to you, Mahdheebah